Mac OS X Tips

All of the information, instructions, and recommendations on this Web site are offered on a strictly "as is" basis. Remember "Murphy's Law." Please take the proper precautions before attempting any of the tips or modifications listed here.

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Running Samba on the Mac OS X Server: Windows File Sharing service

Setup Procedures

The usual method of using System Preferences to enable Samba does not apply to Mac OS X Server. Unlike Mac OS X, the Sharing pane of System Preferences does not include an option to turn on Windows File Sharing. Instead, there is a set of applications to configure, activate, and monitor services: Workgroup Manager, Server Settings, Server Status, and Open Directory Assistant, all located in the directory /Applications/Utilities.

Configuring and Activating Services

At this point, neither the file shares nor the printer shares are available to SMB clients. To activate them, click the Windows icon in Server Settings, and click Configure Windows Services... Under the General tab, you can set the server's NetBIOS hostname, the workgroup or Windows NT domain in which the server resides, and the description that gets displayed in a browse list. Finally, you can enable boot-time startup of Samba.

 

 

 


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How to share a directory that's on a different volume

  1. Log in to Mac OS X as a user with admin rights
  2. Enable root user via the NetInfo Manager utility: ( Applications > Utilities > NetInfo Manager): http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=106290
  3. Start Terminal. ( Applications > Utilities > Terminal )
  4. In Terminal, type the su commnad to elevate your rights to a root user
  5. add the parameters for the shared directory to /private/etc/smb.conf
    (you can use the pico text editor to edit smb.conf)
  6. close terminal
  7. disable root user
  8. reboot

Here is an example of the parameters that you can add to /private/etc/smb.conf

[Shared]
   path = /Volumes/Mac-HD-2/Shared
   public = yes
   writable = yes
   printable = no

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Disable Spotlight

What is Spotlight?

Spotlight indexes files on your computer transparently and in the background to facilitate searching. Of course, this uses memory and processing power, thus slowing down your computer. If you’re running a Mac that’s slower than 800Mhz, this slowdown is obvious when you try to launch programs or copy large files.

Completely disable Spotlight

To disable Spotlight, edit /etc/hostconfig to change "SPOTLIGHT=-YES-" to "SPOTLIGHT=-NO-".

Then to get rid of the existing indexes, run the following two commands from Terminal:

sudo mdutil -i off / /Volumes/* 
sudo mdutil -E / /Volumes/*

The first command disables indexing on all volumes, and the second erases the existing indexes on all volumes.

Reboot.

If you later want Spotlight after all, it's easy to reactivate by editing /etc/hostconfig to change "SPOTLIGHT=-NO-" to "SPOTLIGHT=-YES-".

Use the following command to enable indexing on all volumes:

sudo mdutil -i on / /Volumes/* 

Reboot.


Disable Spotlight's indexing on ALL volumes, but still allow searching by filename.

To disable indexing and remove the existing indexes, run the following two commands from Terminal:

sudo mdutil -i off / /Volumes/* 
sudo mdutil -E / /Volumes/*

The first command disables indexing on all volumes, and the second erases the existing indexes on all volumes.

To reverse the process, use the following command to enable indexing on all volumes:

sudo mdutil -i on / /Volumes/* 

A few seconds after running this command, Spotlight will begin reindexing your volumes.

For Additonal info, see:

 

 


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